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This is the Patterns Library, a listing of books and papers. We are working on a repository for finding a list of the most important pattern books and papers. If you have a book or paper link please submit it.

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From Book News, Inc.
Offers software developers working in small teams advice on using software configuration management practices more effectively, particularly for version control. The authors overview the software configuration management (SCM) pattern language, and define nine patterns that describe the structure of a workspace, such as the private system build and smoke test, and seven patterns that describe the structure of codelines, such as the active development line and task branch.Copyright © 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Synopsis
This volume examines proven software configuration management strategies to allow professionals to deliver quality software systems with the least amount of wasted effort. It is designed to help managers build and foster a development environment focused on producing optimal teamwork.

ASIN: 0201741172

More Information, Table of Contents, etc.

Organizations have moved beyond the pilot project stage and are now using object technology to build large-scale, mission-critical business applications. Unfortunately they are finding that the processes which proved so successful on small, proof-of-concept projects do not scale very well for real-world development. Today’s organization needs a collection of proven techniques for managing the complexities of large-scale, object-oriented software development projects, a collection of process patterns. A process pattern (see An Introduction To Process Patterns White Paper) describes a collection of general techniques, actions, and/or tasks for developing object-oriented software. An important feature of a process pattern should be that it describes what should be done but not the exact details of how it is done.

The object-oriented software process (OOSP) presented in this book is a collection of process patterns that are geared toward medium to large-size organizations that need to develop software that support their main line of business. I have chosen to describe the OOSP as a collection of process patterns that have been proven in practice: they are not the theoretical musings of an ivory-tower academic who has never built an application. The OOSP provides a framework which addresses issues such as how to:

  • Successfully deliver large applications using object technology

  • Develop applications that are truly easy to maintain and enhance

  • Manage these projects

  • Ensure that your development efforts are of high quality.

More information

Organizations have moved beyond the pilot project stage and are now using object technology to build large-scale, mission-critical business applications. Unfortunately they are finding that the processes which proved so successful on small, proof-of-concept projects do not scale very well for real-world development. Today’s organization needs a collection of proven techniques for managing the complexities of large-scale, object-oriented software development projects, a collection of process patterns. A process pattern (see An Introduction To Process Patterns White Paper) describes a collection of general techniques, actions, and/or tasks for developing object-oriented software. An important feature of a process pattern should be that it describes what should be done but not the exact details of how it is done.

The object-oriented software process (OOSP) presented in this book, a continuation of
Process Patterns, is a pattern language that is geared toward medium to large-size organizations that need to develop software that support their main line of business. I have chosen to describe the OOSP as a collection of process patterns that have been proven in practice: they are not the theoretical musings of an ivory-tower academic who has never built an application. The OOSP provides a framework which addresses issues such as how to:

  • Successfully deliver large applications using object technology
  • Develop applications that are truly easy to maintain and enhance
  • Manage these projects
  • Ensure that your development efforts are of high quality.

Cambridge University Press/SIGS Books, 1999

ISBN#: 0-521-65262-6

 

Book Description
Business applications are designed using profound knowledge about the business domain, such as domain objects, fundamental domain-related principles, and domain patterns. Nonetheless, the pattern community's ideas for software engineering have not impacted at the application level, they are still mostly used for technical problems. This book takes exactly this step: it shows you how to apply the pattern ideas in business applications and presents more than 20 structural and behavioral business patterns that use the REA (resources, events, agents) pattern as a common backbone. If you are a developer working on business frameworks, you can use the patterns presented to derive the right abstractions (e.g., business objects) and to design and ensure that the meta-rules (e.g., process patterns) are followed by the developers of the actual applications. And if you are an application developer, you can use these patterns to design your business application, to ensure that it does not violate the domain rules, and to adapt the application to changing requirements without the need to change the overall architecture. As with patterns in general, this approach allows for both more flexible and more solid software architectures and hence better software quality.

About the Author
Pavel Hruby works at Microsoft Development Center Copenhagen in Denmark as part of an architecture team developing the framework for next-generation business software applications that exploit business patterns as one of their primary modeling abstractions. Pavel’s experience includes the application of patterns in object-oriented frameworks, models, and model transformations. He is active in the patterns community, is a member of the Hillside Group and Hillside Europe, and was a chairman of VikingPLoP 2002, the First Nordic Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs.

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